spiritchild

Press

THE MORAL ECONOMY A MAINSTREAM IDEA

A MAINSTREAM IDEA

SPIRITCHILD AT THE #CHALLENGINGCAPITALISTMODERNITYIII CONFERENCE – EXCLUSIVE PROPAGANDA

SpiritChild, revolutionary hip-hop artist from around the world, gave a workshop and a performance at this year’s Challenging Capitalist Modernity III conference in Hamburg, Germany. Eddy caught up with him afterwards to get his thoughts. Join in on this Exclusive Propaganda to hear about the role of culture and hip hop in changing the world.

Audio (download):

Audio Player

“A freedom singer from the South Bronx by way of Brooklyn, spiritchild uses the arts to cultivate a cultural revolution throughout the world, from the United States to Europe, from Africa to South East Asia.” This quotation doesn’t say enough about SpiritChild. His work and his music demonstrates the deep spiritual connection that we have with the world and with each other. Our conversation ranges from the role of women in the Kurdish freedom movement, to the origins of hip hop as the “bastard child” of black political culture, to how Spirit Child got his name.

Staying in tune with and contributing to the pulse of young people’s musical and social heartbeat is at the core of this artist’s life work. spiritchild has extensive experience developing and leading workshops and programs on Critical Revolutionary Hip Hop pedagogy, songwriting and artist development. spiritchild has worked with homeless youth, youth offenders and young emerging artists as program director of One Mic and EAR (Emerging Artists in Residency) for Art Start and as a mentor, teaching artist and consultant for Urban Art Beat. Both are New York based nonprofit organizations that use the power of creative arts and music to transform youth. spiritchild continues to engage, inspire and uplift youth in community centers, juvenile detention facilities, high schools, colleges and universities throughout the world.

This revolution is not only a political one, it is cultural as well, and it needs art just as much as it needs science.

Homepage: http://www.xspiritmental.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/xspiritmental/

BRIC Studios BK Live

New Hip-Hop Summer Camp for Social Justice Focuses on Keeping the Peace | BK Live

Urban Art Beat, Art Start, and a whole lot of partner organizations are bringing teenagers to Crown Heights for what's called "Hip-Hop Summer Camp for Social Justice."

 

BRIC Studios

Peace and bliss planet rockers!
This show features SPIRITCHILD. He is an inspiration to us all. From mentoring youth to ripping the microphone- he is Hip Hop.
Watch as he breaks down his positive activities around the world and spins for us as well.
Hosted by John Robinson, this episode will have you pressing rewind!

VISUAL CAFFEINE-episode45-VISIONARIES from SEN ONE6 UZN on Vimeo.

Intercultural Journeys

INTERCULTURAL JOURNEYS PRESENTS FARAH SIRAJ WITH SPECIAL GUEST SPIRITCHILD

October 10, 2014

Concert begins at 7:30pm

Location: Ibrahim Theater at International House Philadelphia

Tickets available for purchase through International House Philadelphia, or call the International House Philadelphia Box Office at 215.387.5125 then press 2.

Tickets: $15 General Admission/ $10 for International House Philadelphia members/ $8 Students

This concert is performed with generous support by Her Royal Highness Princess Alia Al Hussein

New! Read the interview with Farah Siraj here.  Listen to the podcast here.


Photo of Farah Siraj by Ann Blake.


 

Join us for our inaugural concert at the Ibrahim Theater at International House Philadephia with IJ artist, Farah Siraj, her Arabian Flamenco band, and special guest spiritchild. Farah and her band have performed across the U.S., Middle East, and throughout Europe for numerous dignitaries and populations. This concert will feature an upbeat and unique blend of flamenco, jazz, bossa nova, and hip-hop from self-identified freedom singer, spiritchild.


BIO: FARAH SIRAJ

Named Jordan's “Musical Ambassadress”, Jordanian virtuoso Farah Siraj balances a career that spans the United States, Europe and the Middle East. Farah has performed at some of the world's most prestigious platforms, including the United Nations, Nobel Prize Hall, the World Economic Forum, the TV show Good Morning Live in the USA, MBC TV in the Middle East and the Antena de Oro Awards of Spain. Farah has performed before HM King Abdullah II and HM Queen Rania of Jordan, HM King Juan Carlos of Spain, HRH Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum and HE Secretary-General of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon. In addition, Farah represents Jordan annually on United Nations World Peace Day.           

In 2011 Farah internationally released her album entitled NOMAD, funded personally by His Majesty King Abdullah II of Jordan. In NOMAD, Farah performs her original compositions, fusing influences of middle eastern music, flamenco, jazz, bossa and pop, with lyrics in Arabic, Spanish and English. The recordings took place in the Middle East, Spain and the USA, including more than 30 internationally acclaimed musicians from five different continents.

In early 2012, after the success of NOMAD, Farah presented the world premiere of her new work, entitled The Arabian Jazz Project, featuring original compositions and traditional middle eastern tunes set to a jazz context. As a result of the success of The Arabian Jazz Project, Farah was chosen as one of the “Summer Stars of Jazz” by New York's The Villager Newspaper, and named “the Norah Jones of the Middle East” by New York Time Out.

In addition to the productions of NOMAD and The Arabian Jazz Project, Farah currently leads an ethnically diverse quintet of Arabian Flamenco Jazz, with world-class musicians from the Middle East, Europe, the United States and South America, including music from all four regions.  Farah and her Arabian Flamenco Jazz band were flown in to Dubai in November 2012 to inaugurate the opening of the world's tallest hotel with a concert under the patronage of HH Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum.

Farah studied at the prestigious Trinity College of Music in London and Berklee College of Music in Boston, where she was recognized for her lush Arabian vocals, as mentioned in the article “Out of Berklee, A Gift of Music” by the Boston Globe. Farah's music often expresses the reality of war and raises awareness for the urgent need for peace. In recognition of her humanitarian efforts, Farah was invited to perform at the 2012 United Nations Humanitarian Awards in New York. In addition, Farah's music was played before the United Nations Security Council before passing a legislation regarding the genocide in Darfur. 

Learn more about Farah here: www.farahsiraj.com

Hear more of Farah’s music here: http://www.farahsiraj.com/music.html

BIO: SPIRITCHILD

 

spiritchild, as he is known, is a freedom singer from the south Bronx by way of Brooklyn, who uses the arts to cultivate a cultural revolution. He integrates activism and hip hop music production as the founder of the Movement In Motion Artist & Activist Collective. As the Rhythmic Poet of the Hip Hop Fusion Band Mental Notes, he uses his music to converse with his audience to the injustices facing the poor and oppressed, inspiring action on environmental and social justice in New York City and around the world. No one attends a session with spiritchild without leaving encouraged. His ability to draw out creativity and confidence heals those around him, and is the catalyst for deep analysis and social change. He is an instructor for songwriting and artist at several public schools throughout New York, and facilitates that process internationally on seasonal tours in Africa, South East Asia, Europe and elsewhere.  spiritchild has assisted with organizing regional conferences on climate change, he is highlighting disaster relief and environmental justice with black, brown and other oppressed people. He has also produced and recorded with and for award winning Grammy® nominee Maya Azucena, legendary Les Nubians, spoken word nuyorican poets champion Ainsley Burrows, X-Vandals & Ricanstructions very own N4P to name a few. Balance has been created by engaging and developing the youth with hip hop pedagogy as program director of One Mic and founder of One Mic Collective/Art Start working with youth offenders as well as in Children’s Village Dobbs Ferry New York Juvenile Detention Facility.   He has also worked with and for intellectually disabled and psychologically diagnosed adults in the Bronx.

Find out more about spiritchild here: http://xspiritmental.com/band_bio/#sthash.4IICOgQ5.dpuf

Daily News

Hip Hop Summer Camp for Social Justice gives youth affected by gun violence and police brutality an outlet

Twenty youngsters affected by gun violence and police brutality were given an outlet to express their pain through music and poetry, during a four-day intensive Hip Hop Summer Camp for Social Justice at Harlem's SCAN Johnson Community Center.

 

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

 

Tuesday, September 2, 2014, 8:42 PM
Chris Ross and Eric Morrison perform at the 20th annual Nicholas Heyward Jr. Day of Remembrance.ROY ANTHONY MORRISONChris Ross and Eric Morrison perform at the 20th annual Nicholas Heyward Jr. Day of Remembrance.

They're turning their anger into art.

Twenty youngsters affected by gun violence and police brutality were given an outlet to express their pain through music and poetry, during a four-day intensive Hip Hop Summer Camp for Social Justice at Harlem’s SCAN Johnson Community Center.

I want people to feel what I've been through.

“I can paint a vivid picture with music,” said Michael David Love, 21, of East Harlem, whose life changed after he watched cops roughup his friend.

Mural created by the camp participants centered around gun violence and police brutalityROY ANTHONY MORRISONMural created by the camp participants centered around gun violence and police brutality

“I was furious, scared, nervous. I didn’t know how to act toward it at all,” the young rapper said. “I want people to feel what I’ve been through.”

Christopher Zargoza and Bremman Burgos rehearsing their original song on gun violence and police brutalityROY ANTHONY MORRISONChristopher Zargoza and Bremman Burgos rehearsing their original song on gun violence and police brutality

The program — sponsored by Urban Art Beat, Art Start and The Next Youth Coalition — kicked off Aug. 18 amid protests over the death of Eric Garner in Staten Island and Mike Brown in Ferguson, MO. Garner died July 17 after officers placed him in a chokehold and Brown, whose death sparked national outrage and riots, was shot dead by police on Aug. 9.

John Pritchett, Michael David Yan, Breani Michele, Gelsing Arauz pose after their performance at the 20th annual Nicholas Heyward Jr. Day of Remembrance.ROY ANTHONY MORRISONJohn Pritchett, Michael David Yan, Breani Michele, Gelsing Arauz pose after their performance at the 20th annual Nicholas Heyward Jr. Day of Remembrance.

It connects aspiring emcees, poets and singers, between the ages of 13 and 21, with industry professionals and anti-violence groups to craft performances that express their experiences.

Their works were showcased last Sunday at The Youth Speak Out Against Police Brutality event at Marcus Garvey Park and on Aug. 23 in Brooklyn for the 20th Annual Day of Remembrance for Nicholas Heyward Jr., who was shot dead by police in 1994.

“It is a bit of magic,” said Rosaleen Knoepfel, who founded Urban Art Beat in 2005 in response to mounting gun violence. “It’s intense emotionally and productively.”

“People are really angry,” she said, “but don’t always translate that into change.”

jransom@nydailynews.com

 

Blue Note Jazz Festival

Spiritchild & Mental Notes

@ Blue Note Jazz Club – Show @ 12:30AM Friday Night (Doors @ 12AM/Midnight)


New York City’s original hip-hop ensemble Mental Notes has been attracting diverse audiences with its sound and vibrations since 1999. The group’s eclectic fusion of old school hip-hop, funk, electronica, jazz, and acid rock continues to break the boundaries of the New York live music scene.

Lead vocalist and emcee Spiritchild has produced several film scores and spoken word albums for Nuyorican Slam Champions Ainsley Burrows and SmokiFantastic and has released multiple solo albums, including A Tribute to Nina Simone (2001), Eclipse of Hope (2005), and Dark Matters (2010). Together, he and the other members of Mental Notes create an intense listening experience that rivals any sound to come out of the NYC hip-hop scene in recent memory.

« Back to Events
Date:
June 6, 2014
Cost:
$10 - $15
Venue:
Blue Note Jazz Club

St Martin Haus

Videos

Hier stellen wir euch ein kleine Auswahl von Videos vor, die bei der Arbeit im St.Martin-Haus entstanden sind.

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Den Anfang machen wir mit dem Song “Die Welt in der ich lebe”. Zu Beginn des Videos stellen sich einige Jugendliche vor und gewähren einen kurzen Einblick in das HipHop-Projekt des St.Martin-Hauses:

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Im folgenden Song “14 Uhr” von Shalau Baban alias “Maxolan” reflektiert der 18-jährige Schüler über den Alltag und die Lebenssituation von Jugendlichen im Wadtal:

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Das Video “International” ist bei unserer Jugendbegegnungsreise nach New York im Sommer 2011 entstanden:

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“Stand Up” von den Woodvalley Kids gemeinsam mit unserem New Yorker Freund “Spiritchild”der uns im Mai 2012 für einen Workshop besuchte :

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“Integration” von Woodvalley Movement featuring G-Hun:

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“Danke Mum und Dad” von Nadge:

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Gangway Beatz Berlin to Prague

 

this video sums up our international youth delegation from Berlin to Prague Dec 2011 - Jan 2012

with interviews, performances and process.  big up to Olad for putting this mini doc together and the gangway beatz crew.

also much love to Ivanka Mariposa Čonková for the concept and keeping the mission and vision of Movement In Motion across waters.  special thanks to our international community Movement In Motion Berlin, and now Movement in Motion Prague. 

MC Metoděj Constantine for continuing the work with our youth in Ulita.

GangwayBeatz and Mental Notes working with youths in Prague.......

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Slova-m%C3%ADsto-zbran%C3%AD-hiphop-projekt-v-Ulit%C4%9B/228942263824801?sk=info

Genre
Hip-hop, Street dance, Break dance
Hometown
Praha
Record Label
DDM Ulita
Description
Česko- německý projekt Slova místo zbraní s Newyorským hiphoperem Spiritchildem.

Přijďte 27.9. v 17hodin do DDM Ulita na jeho show!

Dozvíš se víc a můžeš si vybrat jestli volnou středu 28.9.i budeš věnovat dělání hip hopu se Spiritchildem, nebo jestli budeš tančit s Adélou a Standou.

Co je , ale jistý Spiritchild se ti může věnovat celou středu! Tak neváhej anapiš si pro více informací.

Program:

27.9. 17.00 Show Spiritchilda v DDM Ulita
Představení projektu Slova místo zbraní

28.9. 10 - 12h Dílna hip-hopu se Spiritchildem I.
10 - 12h Street dance a breakdance I.

12 - 13h pauza na občerstvení

13 - 15h Dílna hip-hopu se Spiritchildem II.
13 - 15h Street dance a break dance II.

29.9. 16.00 Závěr první části projektu

V Prosinci se Spiritchild vrátí a ti, kdo s ník pracovali na hudbě natočí CD a tanečníci k němu natočí videoklip!

CELÝ PROJEKT JE PODPOŘEN EVROPSKOU UNIÍ A ÚČAST NA NĚM JE ZDARMA.

Isis WordPress

Catch Isis Storm Alongside Wash. DC’s Head-Roc and NYC’s Spiritchild: The Empower Providence Show at Roots

7OCT

TODAY AT ROOTS in Downtown Providence:

THE EMPOWER PROVIDENCE PROJECT

Featuring DC’s Mayor of Hip Hop, Head-Roc
NYC’s Spiritchild and RI’s own Isis Storm

 

@ROOTS Cultural Center
276 Westminster Street
Providence, RI 02903

 

Mixer & Marketplace, 6 PM
Live Performances, 8 PM$10 advanced
$12 at door
$7.00 for students, veterans,
senior citizens, and groups of 3 or moreINFO-TIX-SPONSOR-VENDOR:
www.VenusSings.com
www.IsisStorm.com
(401) 217-9680
singsvenus@gmail.com
***
MORE INFO
1) Click here to listen to the Wednesday, October 5 edition of Sonic Watermelons, which includes samples of music from Head-Roc, Spiritchild, and 5th Elament of Isis Storm – and details about today’s show and other community events.
2) Read more below

 

Hip Hop Show Gathers Visiting Musicians, Local Artists and Activists to “Empower Providence” and Inspire Youth

 

PROVIDENCE, RI – The Empower Providence Project is a multidimensional cultural celebration happening on Friday, October 7, 2011, beginning with community service and civic engagement and culminating with an evening performance in downtown Providence by Washington, DC based hip hop artist, Head-Roc; NYC-based hip hop artist and “freedom singer,” Spiritchild; and RI-based artists from the women’s performance group, Isis Storm.  It is part of a movement to connect the public to artists and musicians who explore community issues in their work, and it comes at the same time as the Occupy Wall Street direct actions that have stirred up community members of all ages and backgrounds – and sparked similar “occupy” activities in DC, Boston, and here in Providence.

 

Head-Roc is an independent musician who has gained most of his fan base through two decades of live performances and activism.  He has been outspoken on issues of racism, neglect of communities of color, and inequities in urban school districts, and he regularly writes songs advocating for workers rights, environmental justice, and using music to grow political movements.  Before his evening performance, he will speak to and perform for a rally organized by youth from RI Jobs with Justice, a grassroots community organization located in Providence.

Spiritchild, who is from the south Bronx and Brooklyn, is also known for integrating activism and music.  He uses his art to converse with his audience about the injustices facing the poor and oppressed, the dangers of climate change, and the need to take on environmental justice issues, in New York City and around the world. He is also an instructor in songwriting at several public schools throughout New York.  Prior to his evening performance, he will speak to and perform for students and families of the Mount Hope Learning Center’s 21st Century After School Program in Providence.

All of the festivities happen on October 7, 2011 and members of the RI-based artist collective, Isis Storm, will also participate along the way.  Isis Storm is a group of women who use art, words and music to empower women and underserved communities, specifically through performances, workshops, and media projects. The group was founded by writer, DJ, and multimedia producer, Reza C. Clifton (DJ Reza Wreckage), and hip hop artist, poet and scholar-educator, Kalyana Champlain (5th Elament).

The Empower Providence Project culminates with performances from Head-Roc, Spiritchild and Isis Storm at the Roots Cultural Center, 276 Westminster Street in downtown, Providence, starting at 8:00 PM.  The event is open to the public and attendees of all ages, and admission is $7 to $12 dollars depending on group rates, special discounts and whether tickets are bought ahead of time or at the door.   Besides performances by Head-Roc, Spiritchild and Isis Storm, WRIU, 90.3 host, DJ Kellan, will also spin music, and there will be open mic opportunities sprinkled through out the evening.

Prior to the event, from 6-8 PM, event sponsors and the community-at-large are invited to join Isis Storm, RI Jobs With Justice, Environmental Justice League of RI, Mount Hope Learning Center, and other community organizations to learn about some of the community issues that exist here in RI, at “The People of Culture Mixer and Marketplace.”

Click here to purchase (and print) tickets to tonight’s show or call (401)217-9680 to sign up for the group/student/special rate.

Rozhovor Prague

Spiritchild rozhovor Movement In Motion Prague

 

spiritchild interview in Prague 30.4.2011
movement in motion, mental notes, one mic
interviewed conducted and translated by Anna Oravoca
Rozhovor uskutečnila a prelozila: Anna Oravoca
REPRO STUDIO

Rappen ist mehr als cool

Regensburg 20.02.2011, 16:49 Uhr

Rappen ist mehr als cool

Der Hip-Hop-Workshop im Jugendzentrum Königswiesen war ein großer Erfolg. „Spiritchild“ aus New York überzeugte alle.

Zum Tanzkurs der anderen Art strömten Jugendliche ins Jugendzentrum Königswiesen.

Zum Tanzkurs der anderen Art strömten Jugendliche ins Jugendzentrum Königswiesen.

Regensburg „Hip-Hop besteht nicht nur aus Rappen, nein dazu gesellen sich auch die fünf weiteren Grundelemente wie Graffiti, Breakdance, DJing, MCing und Knowledge, das Wissen über die Kulturen“, erklärte Esther Günther, Sozialpädagogin im Jugendzentrum Königswiesen (JUZ) und selbst eine begeisterte Rapperin. Und sie muss es ja schließlich wissen, handelt doch ihre Diplomarbeit über just dieses Thema.

„Rappen hat viel mit einem Gemeinschaftssinn zu tun. Hier können sich kreative Kids ausleben und ihre eigene Identität erfahren“, ergänzte Günther. So lag es nahe, diese Möglichkeiten den Regensburger Jugendlichen anzubieten. JUZ-Leiter Joachim Wilebnowski sorgte mit seinem motivierten Team und vielen fleißigen, ehrenamtlichen Helfern dafür, dass dieser Workshop perfekt ablaufen und auch kulinarisch mit einigen Gerichten, darunter auch vegetarische Speisen, auftrumpfen konnte.

„Hip-Hop-Workshops haben wir schon öfter abgehalten, aber mit dieser erstklassigen Besetzung und in dieser Größe zum ersten Mal“, sagte JUZ-Sozialpädagoge Helge Stadler, nicht ganz ohne Stolz. Mehr als 20 Teilnehmer, die teilweise bis aus Nürnberg angereist kamen, waren der Einladung zum Hip-Hop-Workshop an diesem Wochenende gefolgt, um hautnah den bekannten Rapper „Spiritchild“ aus New York zu erleben. Der 32-jährige Rapper referierte über die Entstehungsgeschichte des Raps, räumte mit den klassischen Klischees beispielsweise über Gangster-Rapper auf und brachte es auf den Punkt: „Rap ist sozialkritisch, politisch motiviert und legt mitunter auch den Finger in die Wunde.“ Dass sich einige seiner Rap-Kollegen von Wirtschaft und Industrie beeinflussen lassen, sei sehr schade.

Discover the UNIVERSE with Kilusan

Monday, January 24, 2011

Article on Spirit Child and Mental Notes







Last Thursday night, Jan 19th, 2011, I checked out Spirit Child and Mental Notes, a New York City based Hip Hop band at Nublu, a local bar in the Lower Eastside of Manhattan.

 

I’ve seen Spirt Child rock mics at several different performances throughout NYC and I’m always blown away by his ability to remain true to his thought provoking lyrical content.To have a 3-piece band backing him up allows audience members to embark on a journey through culture, politics and the transformative process of Hip Hop at its best!

 

“The revolution will be televised right through your system….. The revolution will be all in you!”

 

I always learn something different from Spirit Child’s conscious messages. He rhymes with such grace and skill, either conveying a controversial subject such as police brutality in America or blasting classic Hip Hop sounds that make you want to get your groove on the dance floor!

 

The venue, Nublu, had a tree standing strong and proud in the back of the main performance stage. As a result, I was reminded that Spirit Child is a Hip Hop griot and together with Mental Notes, they are preserving culture “by any means necessary!”

 

Check Spirit Child and Mental Notes out at:

 

Indy Media

Kampf für Menschenrechte mit langem Atem

Andrea Tams 15.11.2009 19:55 Themen: Antirassismus Repression Soziale Kämpfe Weltweit
Image
Während die Todesstrafe in den USA nach wie vor in vielen Bundesstaaten praktiziert wird, meldet sich die erste in der jüngeren Geschichte erfolgreiche Kampagne dagegen zurück. 1995 konnte zum ersten Mal seit der Wiedereinführung des staatlichen Mordens von 1976 eine Hinrichtung durch Massenproteste verhindert werden. Damals sollte Mumia Abu-Jamal hingerichtet werden, was am Widerstand von Hundertausenden scheiterte. Das wiederholte sich auch 1999 - nun sieht es so aus, als ob Pennsylvanias Justiz und Regierung es noch einmal wissen will.
Mumia Abu-Jamal, afroamerikanischer Journalist und ehemaliger Pressesprecher der Black Panther Party, war 1982 in einem höchst umstrittenen Verfahren zum Tode verurteilt worden. Angeblich habe er einen Polizisten erschossen. So wenig neu diese aus der Zeit des "Counter-Intelligence-Programme" (  http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/COINTELPRO ) stammende Pauschalbeschuldigung zum Ausschalten missliebiger Kritiker in den USA auch war, gaben sich die Behörden dabei keine allzu großen Mühen. In einem Bericht von Amnesty International wurde 2000 festgestellt, dass dieses Verfahren "einen Bruch der internationalen Mindeststandards fairer Verfahren" dargestellt habe. Das gelte auch ausdrücklich für die angebliche Berufungsphase, welcher der gleiche Richter vorsass, der bereits in der Hauptverhandlung sagte: "Ich werde ihnen (gemeint ist hier die Staatsanwaltschaft) helfen, den N.....r zu grillen." Es gibt heute keinen "Beweis" der Anklage mehr, der nicht durch neue Erkenntnisse oder Zeugenaussagen komplett zusammengefallen wäre. Trotzdem weigerte sich die Justiz hartnäckig bis in die höchste Instanz, ein neues Verfahren anzusetzen. 

Gerade aus den Mobilisierungen gegen die zweite angesetzte Hinrichtung von Mumia Abu-Jamal 1999 entstand ein us-weites Netzwerk von TodesstrafengegnerInnen, die sich seit einigen Jahren in der Kampagne zur Beendigung der Todesstrafe (  http://nodeathpenalty.org/ ) koordinieren. Ihre Arbeit ist inzwischen recht erfolgreich. So konnte 2007 die Hinrichtung von Kenneth Foster (  http://mumia-hoerbuch.de/archivstopptodesstrafe.htm#kennethfosterlive ) verhindert werden. Zwischen 2007 und dem Sommer diesen Jahres gelang es dreimal, den Gefangenen Troy Davis vor der Hinrichtung mit der Giftspritze (  http://de.indymedia.org/2008/03/210305.shtml ) zu retten. Aufgrund von starkem gesellschaftlichen Druck ordnete der US Supreme Court im Juli 2009 ein neues Verfahren für Troy Davis an, etwas, was seit Jahren aufgrund der Beweislage überfällig war. 

Der Bundesstaat New Mexico schaffte die Todesstrafe 2009 endgültig ab, in Alaska scheiterte bisher der Versuch, selbige einzuführen. Maryland und Connecticut setzten sie aus, bis entschieden sei, ob sie nun abgeschafft werde oder nicht. Natürlich gibt es auch Bundesstaaten, die mit aller Gewalt versuchen, diesen Trend um zu drehen. Allen voran Texas, wo gerade erst vor kurzem Governeur Rick Perry überführt wurde, 2004 einen Unschuldigen hingerichtet zu haben. Unmittelbar nach den entsprechenden Veröffentlichungen ordnete er in einem ähnlich erscheinenden Fall die Hinrichtung an (  http://de.indymedia.org/2009/10/264402.shtml ). Seit dem mordet der Staat Texas weiter. Sie werden wie im jeden Jahr wohl auch diesmal "Spitzenreiter" innerhalb der USA bleiben. 

Weltweit stehen die USA an 5. Stelle derjenigen Staaten, in denen Gefangene ermordet werden (  http://www.stern.de/wissen/mensch/todesstrafe-usa-unter-den-top-5-der-henker-weltweit-1520831.html ). Amnesty International registrierte 2008 nur in China, dem Iran, Saudi-Arabien und Pakistan mehr Exekutionen. Insgesamt gibt es nur noch 58 Staaten, in denen die Todesstrafe angewandt wird. 

Die Obama Regierung hat sich seit ihrer Amtseinführung bei diesem Thema zurückhaltend verhalten, auch wenn sich das jetzt in Bezug auf die neuen Verfahren gegen vermeintliche "September Eleven" Angeklagte ändern könnte. Hier handelt es sich um Gefangene aus dem extralegalen Lager Guantanamo, die unter Folter Tatbeteiligung an den verheerenden Anschlägen auf das World Trade Center 2001 eingestanden haben sollen. In den allermeisten Fällen unterliegen die Gefangenen jedoch nicht der föderalen sondern der bundesstaatlichen Autorität. Zwar hatte sich Obama für US-Verhältnisse halbherzig zur Todesstrafe bekannt, aber es dennoch absolut vermieden, "Law and Oder" Hetze in seinem Wahlkampf zu thematisieren. Selbst die Gegenseite unter McCain hatte davon Abstand genommen. Laut neueren Umfragen lehnen bis zu 75% der US-BürgerInnen die derzeit angewandte Praxis der Todesstrafe ab, die sie sich hauptsächlich gegen Menschen ohne Einkommen und Angehörige ethnischer Minderheiten richtet. 

Während in vielen Ländern mit Spannung auf eine Entscheidung des US Supreme Courts über die von Pennsylvania beantragte Wiedereinsetzung der Todesstrafe gegen Mumia Abu-Jamal gewartet wird, bekam US-Justizminister Eric Holder am letzten Donnerstag, den 12. November überraschenden Besuch. Ein Bündnis aus vielen Organisationen (1) überbrachte dem Justizminister mehrere Kisten voller Unterschriften, die eine staatliche Untersuchung über den Rassismus in der Justiz am Beispiel von Mumia Abu-Jamal fordern (  http://mumia-hoerbuch.de/mumiadeutsch.htm#petitionholder ). Unter den UnterzeichnerInnen waren u.a. auch Angela Davis, Ruby Dee, Charles Rangel, Cynthia McKinney, Noam Chomsky, Cornel West und Tariq Ali. In einem Gespräch mit der größten US-Bürgerrechtsbewegung, dem NAACP erklärte Holder, dass er über den Fall im Bilde sei und sich dazu äussern werde. 

Auch ausserhalb der USA intensivieren sich in vielen anderen Ländern die Vorbereitungen, um Mumias Leben zu retten sowie endlich seine Freiheit nach fast 28 Jahren Gefängnis zu erreichen. Ein Aktionstag "Mumia 3+12" sowie ein zentraler Demonstrationstag werden derzeit u.a. in den USA, Mexico, Kanada, Brasilien, Guadaloupe, Südafrika, Algerien, der Türkei, Griechenland, Italien, der Schweiz, Spanien, Frankreich, Holland, England oder auch der BRD vorbereitet (  http://rote-hilfe.de/news/Mumia-Abu-Jamal-Notfalproteste ). 


translation

Struggle for human rights with long breath

Andrea Tams 15/11/2009 19:55 Topics: Anti Racism repression Social struggles Worldwide
Image
While the death penalty is practiced in the United States remains in many states, the first successful campaign against it in recent history is back. 1995 could be prevented by mass protests for the first time since the reintroduction of the state murder of 1976 an execution. At that time, Mumia Abu-Jamal to be executed, which foundered on the opposition of hundreds of thousands. This was repeated in 1999 - now it looks as if Pennsylvania's judiciary and government want to know it again.
Mumia Abu-Jamal, African-American journalist and former press secretary of the Black Panther Party, was sentenced in a highly controversial 1982 trial to death. Supposedly he had shot a police officer. So little new this from the time of "Counter-Intelligence Program" (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/COINTELPRO ) derived Packages accusation was to turn unpopular critics in the USA, the authorities gave it no great troubles. In a report by Amnesty International was found in 2000 that this method had shown "a fraction of the minimum international standards of fair trials." This also applies expressly for the alleged appeal phase, which was chaired by the same judge who said earlier in the trial: "I will give them (meant here is the prosecutor's) help, the N ..... r to grill." Today there is no "proof" of the prosecution more that would not completely collapsed by new evidence or testimony. Nevertheless, the judiciary refused obstinately to the highest authority, to set a new trial.Especially from the mobilizations against the second scheduled execution of Mumia Abu-Jamal was created in 1999 a US-wide network of abolitionists, who in the campaign for several years completion of the death penalty ( http://nodeathpenalty.org/ coordinate). Her work has become quite successful.So could 2007, the execution of Kenneth Foster ( http://mumia-hoerbuch.de/archivstopptodesstrafe.htm#kennethfosterlive ) can be prevented. Between 2007 and the summer of this year succeeded three times, the prisoner Troy Davis from execution by lethal injection (http://de.indymedia.org/2008/03/210305.shtml to save). Due to strong social pressure the U.S. Supreme Court ordered in July 2009, a new method for Troy Davis, something that was long overdue because of the evidence for years. The State of New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 2009 definitively from, in Alaska so far failed the test, introduce the same. Maryland and Connecticut put them out to be decided whether they will now be abolished or not. Of course, there are also states that with all his might try this trend to turn around. Above all, Texas, where it was just transferred recently Governor Rick Perry to have 2004 executed an innocent man. Immediately following the relevant publications, he ordered in a similar appearing case, the execution of (http://de.indymedia.org/2009/10/264402.shtml ). Since the state of Texas murders continue. You will look like in each year, probably this time "Leader" in the United States remain. Worldwide, the United States are in 5th place those States in which prisoners are murdered Amnesty International registered in 2008 only in China, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan more executions. Overall, there are only 58 states where the death penalty is applied. , the Obama administration has behaved cautiously since its inauguration on this issue, even if this might now change in relation to the new proceedings against alleged "September Eleven" defendant. Here are prisoners of the extrajudicial Guantanamo who allegedly admitted complicity in the devastating attacks on the World Trade Center in 2001 under torture. In most cases, however, the prisoners are not subject to federal but the federal authority.Although Obama had known for US relations halfheartedly on the death penalty, but it still absolutely avoided, "Law and Or" to address incitement in his campaign. Even the opposite side under McCain had refrained. According to recent surveys reject up to 75% of U.S. citizens who practice the death penalty currently applied from which they mainly directed against people with no income and ethnic minorities. Whereas in many countries with voltage to a decision of the U.S. Supreme Court on the of Pennsylvania sought to reinstate the death penalty against Mumia Abu-Jamal is waiting, got U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder last Thursday, 12 November surprise visit. An alliance of many organizations (1) brought the Minister of Justice several boxes of signatures calling for a public inquiry into racism in the judicial system on the example of Mumia Abu-Jamal ( http://mumia-hoerbuch.de/mumiadeutsch.htm#petitionholder ). Among the signatories were including Angela Davis, Ruby Dee, Charles Rangel, Cynthia McKinney, Noam Chomsky, Cornel West and Tariq Ali. In an interview with the greatest American civil rights movement, the NAACP said Holder that he was on the case in the picture and will to submit its comments. too outside the United States intensify in many other countries, the preparations to save Mumia's life and finally his to achieve freedom after nearly 28 years in prison. A day of action "Mumia 3 + 12" and a central demonstration day are currently including the United States, Mexico, Canada, Brazil, Guadaloupe, South Africa, Algeria, Turkey, Greece, Italy, Switzerland, Spain, France, Holland, England or the FRG prepared ( http://rote-hilfe.de/news/Mumia-Abu-Jamal-Notfalproteste ). ----------- Explanation: (1) National Lawyers Guild (NYC Chapter), WESPAC, Riverside Justice Prison Ministry, Iglesia San Romero (UCC), Campaign to End the Death Penalty (CEDP), International Action Center (IAC), Peace and Justice Foundation, Families United for Justice in America, Nat Turner Rebellion, Black August Planning Committee, National Jericho Movement, ANSWER and International Concerned Family and Friends of Mumia Abu-Jamal Links:critical site about U.S. criminal law: http://www.christianparenti.com/index.html Mumia emergency protests in different languages: http: // mumia-hoerbuch.de/bundnis.htm#notfallprotesteanderesprachennationwide dates almost daily FREE MUMIA events throughout the country http://mumia-hoerbuch.de/termine.htm nationwide alliances and meeting http: //www.das-mumia-hoerbuch .com / allebundnisse.htm Downloads / materials / web banners http://mumia-hoerbuch.de/aktiv.htmnationwide Views channel list for Mumia emergency protests http://mumia-hoerbuch.de/bundnis.htm#notfallprotesteaufrufer video message of Berliner FREE MUMIA Alliance for press conference in Washington DC on November 12 at the signature handover in German:http://de.sevenload.com/sendungen/Top TV in-OKB/folgen/l2DgRPN-FreeMumia02-German in English:http : //de.sevenload.com/sendungen/Top-TV-in-OKB/folgen/P5HNk2d-FreeMumia02 

Blue Coupe

 Blue Coupe 

 

Close Your Eyes & Open Your Mind

Mental Notes

2001


Buy it online


Reviewed by Steve Nathan

 

 

 

Mental Notes is an original jam band comprised of intelligent musicians that play a high-energy combination of old school acid rock, funk and hip-hop. Mental Notes combines elements of diverse musical styles to create an intense listening experience. Mental Notes plays throughout the New York City area, and, having seen them perform for the past few weeks, I strongly recommend that, if you are around New York City, you check this band out. If you are not in New York, they have a great live CD available, Close Your Eyes & Open Your Mind.

Over the past decades "jam" bands have occupied a unique place in music. Mental Notes pick up where the traditional jam bands leave off, putting their own spin on the jam genre. A CD version of a song may run four minutes, but, when performed live by a jam band, can run three or four times as long. Mental Notes uses the extended jam format of traditional rock bands and expands on that by adding large doses of hip-hop, funk and rock.

If you are familiar with the southern rock sounds of The Allman Brothers, Government Mule and The Outlaws, or San Francisco musicians such as The Grateful Dead, Neil Young and Santana, then you know that when jam musicians perform live, they connect with their audience in a way that makes the audience feel that they are participating in an event that no one aside from the people at the show will ever be part of. This connection is made with the audience through the musician's rendition of familiar songs played in an extended format.

Jamming is primal. It is not about the band; it is about the connection between the band and the audience and the audience members with each other. Think about jam bands this way: when making love with someone that you are really into, do you want it to last several minutes or several hours? For jam enthusiasts the answer is several hours. While not literally looking for nonstop three hour jams, the jam fan wants two things from a jam band: (1) faithfulness to the structure of the song; and (2) time.

As jam aficionados know -- and staying true to that lovemaking analogy while we're at it -- it is not nearly enough to play a song for 12 minutes or more, it is about maintaining the overall cohesiveness of the piece while permitting it to expand on its elements. In other words, the rhythm section is the anchor for the band, allowing vocals, guitars, horns, keyboards to explore and experiment, while maintaining the structure of the song. For any great jam, the listener needs enough time to sit back and take in all the elements without being forced to absorb everything in a four minute radio-friendly format.

A jam band provides its audience with time to go from one aspect of the performance to another at their own pace. The audience can focus on each of the musicians and what they are doing, without needing audio cues to get their attention. Mental Notes is in the mold of the quintessential jam band. They allow you the freedom to go where you want to go at whatever pace you desire.

Mental Notes has a fresh sound and a loyal following. They are one of the hot local bands on the New York scene. I definitely recommend that you check out one of their shows.

Mental Notes is: d (squared), bass; d (one), guitar; travesty, drums; spiritchild, mc/vocals; lloyd, trumpet; and static dj. | April 2002


Steve Nathan is a freelance writer covering the music scene in various cities. Currently on assignment in Hawaii, Steve has written about bands from coast to coast.

(c) 2002 Steve Nathan, licensed for use by Blue Coupe magazine.

 

Tracks
1: Respect the Elements
2: Systematic Analysis
3: Remember
4: Spanish Rose
5: No More
6: Sailing
7: Rectify
8: Reincarnation
9: Upon the Metro
10: Dis-Ease
11: Code Run
12: Love Thing

 

 

 

 

GetGigs.com

"Mental Notes" Live
Mental Notes is an original jam band comprised of intelligent musicians that plays a high-energy combination of old school acid rock, funk and hip-hop. Mental Notes combines elements of diverse musical styles to create an intense listening experience. Mental Notes plays throughout the New York City area, and, having seen them perform for the past few weeks, I strongly recommend that, if you are around New York City, you check this band out. If you are not in New York, they have a great live cd available by mail.

Over the past decades "jam" bands have occupied a unique place in music and Mental Notes picks up where the traditional jam bands leave off and puts its own spin on the jam genre. A cd version of a song may run four minutes, but, when performed live by a jam band, can run three or four times as long. Mental Notes uses the extended jam format of traditional rock bands and expands on that by adding large doses of hip-hop and funk to rock.

If you are familiar with the southern rock sounds of The Allman Brothers, Government Mule and The Outlaws, or San Francisco musicians such as The Grateful Dead, Neil Young and Santana, then you know that when jam musicians perform live, they connect with their audience in a way that makes the audience feel that they are participating in an event that no one aside from the people at the show will ever be part of. This connection is made with the audience through the musician's rendition of familiar songs played in an extended format.

Jamming is primal. It is not about the band; it is about the connection between the band and the audience and the audience members with each other. Think about jam bands this way: when making love with someone that you are really into, do you want it to last several minutes or several hours? For jam enthusiasts, if you analogize to music, the answer is several hours. While not literally looking for non-stop three hour jams, the jam fan wants two things from a jam band: (1) faithfulness to the structure of the song; and (2) time.

As jam aficionados know, it is not nearly enough to play a song for 12 minutes or more, it is about maintaining the overall cohesiveness of the piece while allowing it to expand on its elements. In other words, the rhythm section is the anchor for the band, allowing vocals, guitars, horns, keyboards to explore and experiment, while maintaining the structure of the song. For any great jam, the listener needs enough time to sit back and take in all the elements of the song without being forced to absorb everything in a 4-minute radio-friendly format. A jam band provides its audience with time to go from one aspect of the performance to another at their own pace. The audience can focus on each of the musicians and what they are doing, without needing audio cues to get their attention. Mental Notes is in the mold of the quintessential jam band. They allow you the freedom to go where you want to go at whatever pace you want.

Mental Notes has a fresh sound and a loyal following. They are one of the hot local bands on the New York scene, and I definitely recommend that you check out one of their shows.

Mental Notes is: d (squared) - bass; d (one) - guitar; travesty - drums; spiritchild - mc/vocals; lloyd - trumpet; and static - dj.


Article Copyright © 2002 Steve Nathan, licensed for use by getgigs.com Steve Nathan contact

Sounds Copyright: Mental Notes - "Dis-Ease" from the CD "Close Your Eyes & Open Your Mind" © 2002 Multi Creations, licensed for use on getgigs.com contact

Photos Copyright: Ian Spanier © 2002, licensed for use on getgigs.com contact

Flash Design Copyright © 2002 Matt Kieffer/ TelXtra Interactive.
View Portfolio

 

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PROTECTING OUR WATERS BERKS GAS TRUTH CLEAN AIR COUNCIL CLEAN WATER ACTION DELAWARE RIVERKEEPER NETWORK FOOD & WATER WATCH GAS TRUTH OF CENTRAL PA MARCELLUS OUTREACH BUTLER MARCELLUS PROTEST NEW YORKERS AGAINST FRACKING PENNSYLVANIA ALLIANCE FOR CLEAN AIR AND WATER THE SHALOM CENTER UNITED FOR ACTION

For Immediate Release

For Immediate Release

September 20, 2012

 

Contacts: Iris Marie Bloom, Protecting Our Waters, 215-840-6489 protectingourwaters@gmail.com

Tracy Carluccio, Delaware Riverkeeper Network, 215-692-2329 tracy@delawareriverkeeper.org

 

Why Shale Gas Outrage Filled Philadelphia Streets

Protesters from shale gas “sacrifice zones” and downstream communities protest industry conference, press for bans and moratoria to “stop fracking now”

 

Philadelphia, PAPeople from throughout Pennsylvania and the shale regions of neighboring New York, Ohio, West Virginia and beyond, along with downstreamers from Maryland and Delaware, joined together to protest the Marcellus Shale Coalition’s industry convention in downtown Philadelphia today, making a unified statement to “Stop Fracking Now.”

Shale Gas Outrage rallied from 12:00 to 2:00 PM outside the Convention Center on Arch Street, led by Protecting Our Waters and endorsed by over 45 organizations, all calling for a moratorium on shale gas development wherever it is occurring. Speakers included Josh Fox, Bill McKibben, Maya van Rossum, Sandra Steingraber, Stephen Cleghorn, Stewart Acuff, Wes Gillingham, John Scorsone, Wenonah Hauter, Doug Shields, and members of Pennsylvania communities impacted by gas extraction and development –Tammy Manning and her granddaughter Madison from Susquehanna County; farmers Carol French and Carolyn Knapp from Bradford County; Craig Stevens of Susquehanna County; Mary Rodriguez, a nurse from Luzerne County; and Kevin Heatley, an ecologist from Lycoming County. Musical talent also contributed to the day: Rhetta Morgan, singer from Philadelphia; Spiritchild from Brooklyn, singer song writer Zach Freidhof, and Pennsylvania guitarist Freebo.

A boisterous march through Philadelphia streets followed the high-energy rally. Marchers stopped at four locations to bring the message of Stop Fracking Now. At President Barack Obama’s election campaign headquarters, marchers demanded “Not One More Drop” be withdrawn from the Susquehanna River for fracking; President Obama votes, through the Army Corps of Engineers, on the Susquehanna and Delaware River Basin Commissions. Marchers also demanded sustainable, clean energy instead of shale gas and fossil fuels. Marchers also confronted PNC Bank (heavily invested in shale gas development and mountaintop removal), Governor Tom Corbett’s office (for a statewide moratorium and to stop polluting our communities and environment), and the PA Chamber of Commerce (which has opposed regulating greenhouse gas emissions and aggressively promotes shale gas exports overseas).

At 5:00 pm today, a Blessing of the Waters, an interfaith event, will take place at Arch Street Methodist Church, Broad and Arch Streets, Philadelphia.

As the impacted people with fouled water, polluted air and threatened livelihoods have shown today, shale gas drilling is inherently contaminating. Families should not be forced to live with such dangers and health impacts. The best way to stem the tide of displacement, degraded ecosystems and climate catastrophe is to stop fracking now and divest our support from extreme fossil fuel extraction. We are taking the morally responsible position, out of necessity, for our government has turned a deaf ear to these vital concerns," said Iris Marie Bloom, Executive Director, Protecting Our Waters and lead organizer, Shale Gas Outrage.

The Shale Gas Outrage rally program featured the hardships and suffering that people and communities are experiencing in shale country. A broad spectrum of constituencies, including labor and faith-based speakers, biologists, climate and energy experts, and ordinary people -- came together to make a clear, unified statement to solve the horrific problems facing shale “sacrifice zone” communities – pollution and degradation from shale gas development, including drilling, fracking, infrastructure and all related gas operations. That statement from Shale Gas Outrage and those who took part today offers a positive and reachable solution and one that makes eminent sense when the facts are truly considered – Stop Fracking Now by instituting a shale gas extraction moratorium.

On Friday, Sept. 21, participants will attend the Health Impacts Symposium atCollege of Physicians of Philadelphia, 19. S. 22nd St. Philadelphia, PA. Shale Gas Outrage is screening Kirsi Jansa’s Gas Rush Films from 1 – 2 at Friends Center, followed by strategy sessions. A nonviolent direct action is also listed for early Friday morning.

For a complete list of endorsing organizations and steering committee members go to: http://shalegasoutrage.org/coalition/

For photos and stories about the Rally and March and the events to come in the next day and a half go to: http://shalegasoutrage.org/

###

New York Daily News

Hip Hop Summer Camp for Social Justice gives youth affected by gun violence and police brutality an outlet

Chris Ross and Eric Morrison perform at the 20th annual Nicholas Heyward Jr. Day of Remembrance.

Chris Ross and Eric Morrison perform at the 20th annual Nicholas Heyward Jr. Day of Remembrance.

 (ROY ANTHONY MORRISON)
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Tuesday, September 2, 2014, 8:42 PM

They're turning their anger into art.

Twenty youngsters affected by gun violence and police brutality were given an outlet to express their pain through music and poetry, during a four-day intensive Hip Hop Summer Camp for Social Justice at Harlem’s SCAN Johnson Community Center.

I want people to feel what I've been through.

“I can paint a vivid picture with music,” said Michael David Love, 21, of East Harlem, whose life changed after he watched cops roughup his friend.

Mural created by the camp participants centered around gun violence and police brutality

Mural created by the camp participants centered around gun violence and police brutality

 (ROY ANTHONY MORRISON)

“I was furious, scared, nervous. I didn’t know how to act toward it at all,” the young rapper said. “I want people to feel what I’ve been through.”

Christopher Zargoza and Bremman Burgos rehearsing their original song on gun violence and police brutality

Christopher Zargoza and Bremman Burgos rehearsing their original song on gun violence and police brutality

 (ROY ANTHONY MORRISON)

The program — sponsored by Urban Art Beat, Art Start and The Next Youth Coalition — kicked off Aug. 18 amid protests over the death of Eric Garner in Staten Island and Mike Brown in Ferguson, MO. Garner died July 17 after officers placed him in a chokehold and Brown, whose death sparked national outrage and riots, was shot dead by police on Aug. 9.

John Pritchett, Michael David Yan, Breani Michele, Gelsing Arauz pose after their performance at the 20th annual Nicholas Heyward Jr. Day of Remembrance.

John Pritchett, Michael David Yan, Breani Michele, Gelsing Arauz pose after their performance at the 20th annual Nicholas Heyward Jr. Day of Remembrance.

 (ROY ANTHONY MORRISON)

It connects aspiring emcees, poets and singers, between the ages of 13 and 21, with industry professionals and anti-violence groups to craft performances that express their experiences.

Their works were showcased last Sunday at The Youth Speak Out Against Police Brutality event at Marcus Garvey Park and on Aug. 23 in Brooklyn for the 20th Annual Day of Remembrance for Nicholas Heyward Jr., who was shot dead by police in 1994.

“It is a bit of magic,” said Rosaleen Knoepfel, who founded Urban Art Beat in 2005 in response to mounting gun violence. “It’s intense emotionally and productively.”

“People are really angry,” she said, “but don’t always translate that into change.”

jransom@nydailynews.com

New York Times

 

 

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Where a Hip-Hop Career Begins With a Court Sentence

By HANNAH MIET

 MAY 25, 2012 11:42 AM May 25, 2012 11:42 am 11

 

 

 

By Hannah Miet and Channon Hodge 1:28

A Second Chance at Life and Hip-Hop 

Video

A Second Chance at Life and Hip-Hop

In Brooklyn, the non-profit, Art Start, offers young people with a blighted past a chance to become producers and performers of hip-hop.

 By Hannah Miet and Channon Hodge on Publish DateMay 25, 2012.

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Less than two years ago, Torey Baker was an 18-year-old high-school dropout facing prison time for robbery. When a judge in the Bronx sentenced him instead to six months in an alternative program, plus probation, he considered himself lucky. But he didn’t know the half of it.

On his first day, the counselor who administered his drug test asked Mr. Baker if he had any interest in hip-hop. Because if he did, there was a recording studio right down the hall.

“My mind was blown,” Mr. Baker said one recent evening as he hunched over a laptop in a conference room, fiddling with beats. “I showed up at the studio the first day, and then I just kept showing up.”

The studio belonged to One Mic, a project that teaches young offenders life skills while honing their rhyming, producing and writing skills. In a twist on rap boasts about crime and punishment, the place that helps save minors from hard time is also where they record their first tracks.

Mr. Baker attended One Mic’s workshops as part of his sentence with the jail-alternative agency, which also included daily drug tests and other educational programs. About a year after completing his court-ordered stint, Mr. Baker, a slim, soft-spoken 20-year-old with a piano tattoo on his forearm, has found a home in One Mic. Its parent nonprofit,Art Start, paid for him to attend audio engineering school. He helped found a crew of producers, M.C.’s and vocalists, the “One Mic Collective,” that has toured locally and plans to tour in Germany.

This evening, Mr. Baker was in the studio, a primary-colored back room in a warren of offices belonging to the Center for Community Alternatives, which provides space to One Mic in a graffiti-scarred building near the Brooklyn end of the Brooklyn Bridge. At the control board, he adjusted the levels as one of his main collaborators, Miguel Solano, who is known as Miky, spit a verse, his hands erratic with motion.

One Mic’s program director, Billy Martin, who goes by the name Spiritchild, leaned against the door frame, listening to the two young men discuss a lyric. Would “hidden” be misheard as “hittin’ ”?

Michelle V. Agins/The New York TimesTorey Baker, left, worked the mixing board at One Mic’s studio in a jail-alternative program in Downtown Brooklyn as One Mic’s assistant program director, Anthony Scott, center, and One Mic’s program director, Billy Martin, who uses the name Spiritchild, looked on.

“Who are you writing this for?” Mr. Martin asked Mr. Solano.

Mr. Solano, 21, who came to One Mic three years ago after a drug arrest in Brooklyn, took a moment to consider. “The hood,” he answered. “This is for the hood.”

“Which hood?” Mr. Martin asked. “There are a lot of hoods. There are hoods in India, Afghanistan, Brooklyn. Who are you writing for? What’s the message?”

Mr. Solano took a thought break on the couch in the adjacent library, a room with lime-green walls and inspirational posters that quote Japanese proverbs, Maya Angelou and Jay-Z. He began reworking the lyrics on his BlackBerry. “Yo, M.B.,” he yelled to Mr. Baker, who is also known as Mad Bangers. “Can you send me the beat?”

Soon they were back in the booth. “Hi,” Mr. Solano called out, “my name is Miky and this song is called ‘Walk Inside My Mind.’”

Mr. Baker laughed, his finger hovering over the record button. “You’re on in five … four … three … two … one.”

Michelle V. Agins/The New York TimesMiguel Solano, known as Miky, in the recording booth at the One Mic studio.

Mr. Baker, who grew up in Tremont in the Bronx, taught himself piano when he was 8 and made his first hip-hop beat with a metal spoon and a chair, he said. But in high school, “I was hanging around with the wrong crew.”

On a summer night in 2010, he said, he was out with the wrong crew, and his friends were smashing car windows when a man rode up on his bicycle. The friends beat and robbed the man while Mr. Baker distracted a passing cab. Then Mr. Baker rode home on the man’s bike. He was arrested on second-degree robbery charges and faced up to 15 years in prison.

Instead, he wound up assigned to the Center for Alternative Sentencing and Employment Services, one of many programs that have sprung up as New York has reformed its juvenile-justice system and the number of juvenile offenders sent to state correctional facilities has dropped by 60 percent over 10 years. (One Mic, which operated out of the center’s lower Manhattan office at the time, has since moved to its current Brooklyn home.)

Mr. Martin said that when Mr. Baker first walked through the door, he was uncooperative, insecure and spent most of the time acting out.

“I was just like, ‘Let him be,’” Mr. Martin said. “I never kicked him out of a workshop no matter how crazy he was, and I let him know we had space for him.”

Gradually, Mr. Martin said, Mr. Baker “learned how to be himself without taking up other people’s space.”

In order to earn time in the studio and a slot performing when the One Mic Collective goes on tour, Mr. Baker mentors younger students in One Mic and volunteers at programs for at-risk youth.

The day after his evening with Mr. Solano at the One Mic studio, he helped teach a music workshop at a homeless shelter in the South Bronx, the Prospect Family Inn.

The cacophony could be heard across the street: frantic, discordant, drumming noises; children shrieking with laughter, or just shrieking for the fun of it. In a basement playroom, 20 children arranged chairs in an imperfect circle, divided up buckets and passed around drumsticks.

“They’re actually pretty calm today,” Mr. Baker said. He held his drumsticks above his head, the sign for “be quiet.” One by one, the children followed suit. Mr. Baker made beats on an upside-down bucket for them to mimic — faster, then slower, then quieter. At the end of the workshop, Mr. Baker performed a drum solo, rousing several children to dance.

He headed home on a No. 4 train to his family’s apartment on 183rd Street in the Bronx to work on an old school hip-hop beat Mr. Solano had asked for. No artwork or posters graced the white walls of his room, just taped-up instructions for using mixing software.

Mr. Baker, who has been signed as a producer to a small label, Pyramid Records, dug through a cardboard box of old records. He listened to a few tracks, beatboxed a beat with his hands and mouth, and then replicated the beat on his laptop.

Then he got to work on the melody. His fingers wandered across an electric keyboard, freestyling until he found something ethereal, reminiscent of A Tribe Called Quest. One finger slipped slightly, brushing against the wrong key before hitting the right one. Mr. Baker liked the mistake: it was an old school hip-hop kind of slip-up. He kept it in.

Looking down the road, Mr. Baker said he wanted to do commercials, make music for video games — and continue collaborating with Mr. Solano. “I want to be working with Miky in the industry, doing our own stuff,” Mr. Baker said. “He’s the best rapper, in my eyes.”

The next day, Mr. Baker played the beat for Mr. Solano in a conference room at New York University — One Mic Collective’s borrowed practice space.

Mr. Martin listened and nodded along to the languid beat.

“This is a feel-good track,” he said. “It’s the kind of song that could really engage an audience at concerts.”

Mr. Solano tried to freestyle the hook. “As the world spins around, we enhancing the sound, something, something, something, something around, cause that’s cool,” he said.

Another One Mic Collective M.C., Robert Cornegy III, known as Krhazey 80, took it from there. “As the world spins around, enhancing the sound, romancing the snare, move your body all around, cause that’s cool,” he said.

“That’s cool,” Mr. Martin said. “I like that.”